Webucator Blog

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Inline Web Font to Avoid FOUT

Web fonts enable designers and developers to create great looking websites. The decision to use a web font is easy. But the decision of how to load the web font may not be that easy. In this post we’ll quickly review the issue of FOUT (flash of un-styled text) when loading a web font asynchronously, and then I will show you how you can inline the web font data using a Base64 string.

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Preparing for Angular 2

It’s official – Angular 2.0.0 was just released. If you have been putting off learning Angular 2 until it was finalized, that’s OK, but now is the time to get ready and to dive into it. In this post I will give you five steps that you can take to prepare for Angular 2:

  1. Use TypeScript
  2. Use @types Declaration Files
  3. Use Modules
  4. Use controllerAs
  5. Use Angular 1.5

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Drag-and-Drop Sortable with AngularJS and angular-ui-sortable

Setting up a drag-and-drop sortable list when using AngularJS is not a feature that comes packaged in the framework out of the box. To do this we will need to use one of the directives of AngularUI, a companion suite to the AngularJS framework. The component we will use is the angular-ui-sortable which is the jQuery UI sortable feature for Angular.

For this tutorial we will use the following libraries:

  • Bootstrap 3.x
  • AngularJS 1.5.x +
  • AngularUI Sortable
  • jQuery UI (required by AngularUI Sortable)

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Test-Driven Development Using React.js and ES6 Training

We have another new course at Webucator: Test-Driven Development (TDD) Using React.js and ES6.

Course author and trainer Chris Minnick says, “React.js is a revolutionary way to think about building web applications. Once you understand how React works and how to combine it with the right tools and techniques, it can make your code more reusable, more reliable, faster, and more fun to build.”

React is very new and there aren’t many all-in-one guides to learn everything you need to know to be effective with React. Chris wrote this course to fill that gap so that other developers wouldn’t have to go through the hundreds of hours of searching and trial and error that he went through.

The target student for this training class has some prior experience with JavaScript and wants to learn the latest tools and techniques for building fast and modular applications for the web.

Chris Minnick is a prolific author and trainer, and the CEO of WatzThis?. His published books include Writing Computer Code, JavaScript for Kids, Coding with JavaScript For Dummies, Beginning HTML5 and CSS3 For Dummies, Webkit For Dummies, CIW eCommerce Certification Bible, and New Riders’ XHTML.

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Searchable Bootstrap Accordion Using Angular

The Bootstrap collapse plugin enables some nice functionality, including the ability to create an accordion. In this quick tutorial I want to show you how you can create a way to filter, or search, the data in the accordion. I will be using Angular 1.5 and Bootstrap 3, as well as TypeScript. I will also be using a remote JSON file to create the accordion using the Angular UI Bootstrap directive: uib-accordion. Let’s get started!

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Creating an SVG logo

When creating a logo for a modern website it’s a good idea to use Adobe Illustrator or another program that can create and manipulate vector art to generate an SVG file rather than a photo editing app like Adobe Photoshop that is used to edit and manipulate pixels. The reason to use SVG for a logo and other assets is that SVGs can scale to many different sizes without losing quality and can be manipulated by JavaScript and CSS. In this post I will go over the steps to create a vector logo in Adobe Illustrator and convert it to SVG to be used on your website and lastly how to modify it via code to change size and color.

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New .NET Design Patterns Training Course at Webucator

Webucator is offering a new .NET Design Patterns course.

This course is intended for experienced .NET developers looking to broaden their knowledge and skills by building complex applications that are more maintainable, extensible, and adaptive to change.

The course was written to address the importance for programmers to learn how to use design patterns and best practices to create applications that are easy to modify after initial development. User requirements and technologies change, and the using best practices in this area allows programmers to manage those changes.

This course was written by Jason Bell, who has been writing code since 1982 and teaching .NET development for over 13 years. Jason says, “Design patterns in software have been around since at least 1994 when I began using them in C++ applications. When .NET 1.0 was released, I tried, with limited success, to use those same techniques in .NET Windows and Web applications. Fortunately, in recent years, Microsoft has begun to give serious attention to making it easier for developers to use things like unit testing and dependency injection in their applications. With technologies like WPF and ASP.NET MVC, it is much more natural (and I would argue necessary) to employ the patterns and practices taught in this course.”

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New JIRA Course

Webucator is offering a new course: Introduction to JIRA Administration Training.

This course is meant for JIRA system administrators, project administrators, and end users.

This JIRA course was created to explain the intricacies of project configuration. It begins with a focus on the individual pieces of a project and then teaches how to tie them together. Students will leave with a greater understanding of JIRA installations that they work with every day.

This course was written by Robert Anthony. Robert has administered and configured JIRA installations for multiple startups such as Playdom, Image Metrics, and Concept Art House.

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The 25 Hottest Technologies in Q2 2016

Based on the number of active StackOverflow posts, the 25 hottest technologies of Q2, 2016 are:

  1. JavaScript – 11.7%
  2. Java – 9.9%
  3. Android – 8.6%
  4. PHP – 7.5%
  5. C# – 7.2%
  6. Python – 6.8%
  7. jQuery – 5.2%
  8. HTML – 5.0%
  9. iOS – 4.3%
  10. CSS – 3.5%
  11. C++ – 3.4%
  12. MySQL – 3.1%
  13. AngularJS – 3.1%
  14. SQL – 2.4%
  15. Swift – 2.3%
  16. Node.Js – 2.1%
  17. R – 2.0%
  18. JSON – 1.8%
  19. Ruby on Rails – 1.7%
  20. ASP.NET – 1.7%
  21. C – 1.5%
  22. SQL Server – 1.5%
  23. Objective-C – 1.4%
  24. .NET – 1.3%
  25. Excel – 1.2%

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