HTML: Tips and Tricks

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  1. A nested list or a sublist is a list within a list. The trick to marking nested lists up correctly in HTML is to recognize that the sublist is actually a child of a list item and not of a list.

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  2. Visual Studio Code doesn't have a built-in method for launching HTML and other files in Google Chrome, but you can configure it to do so.

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  3. In this exercise, you will create your first HTML document by simply copying the text shown below. The purpose is to give you some sense of the structure of an HTML document.

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  4. Generally speaking, HTML has two types of tags: empty and container. In this how-to, you'll learn the difference between the two.

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  5. In school, we all learn to write footnotes and bibliographies. On your web pages you should also cite your sources. HTML provides specific markup for doing so.

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  6. HTML tables are created with the <table>, <thead>, <tbody>, <tfoot>, <tr>, <th>, <td>, and <caption> tags.

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  7. I ran into this problem while writing our Creating, Styling, and Validating Web Forms course. I was showing how browsers make an automatic request for "/favicon.ico" when first visiting a new site. However, once they've received the icon or determined it doesn't exist, they don't request it again on subsequent visits. That created a headache for me when trying to show how to deliver the icon. Unfortunately, it's not easy to force the browser to refresh the favicon.ico, but it's doable.

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