Microsoft Access: Tips and Tricks

  1. The Form Wizard gives you more control over your results than one-click forms do. The wizard lets you make decisions about certain aspects of a form's design and produces a form based on your instructions. To create a form based on a single table using the Form Wizard, follow these nine steps.

    Read Article
  2. Similar to the Form Wizard, the Report Wizard walks you through a series of decisions in order to build a report. To create a report using the Report Wizard, follow the steps below.

    Read Article
  3. You can add header and footer sections to a form in Access in just a few simple steps.

    Read Article
  4. You can add header and footer sections to a report in Access in just a few simple steps.

    Read Article
  5. While Datasheet view lets you work directly with the data in tables, Design view takes you behind the scenes to work with the table structure. In Design view you have much finer control over how the fields in your data are defined and validated. You can open a closed table in Design view with just a few clicks.

    Read Article
  6. There will be times when you must rename a table. Before you do, please be aware that any objects that are dependent on the table will need to be updated as well. Access does not rename references for you as other technologies do.

    Read Article
  7. You can move fields in the query grid to rearrange them.

    Read Article
  8. Make the user experience with an application as streamlined as possible by creating a navigation form that presents the main functions of a database in a straightforward and logical way.

    Read Article
  9. Follow these seven steps to add a logo to the header of an Access form.

    Read Article
  10. Follow these four steps to add a title to an Access form header.

    Read Article
  11. You can set the navigation form as the default form that displays when a user opens your application in Access. In addition, you can give the application an official name and an icon to display for forms and reports.

    Read Article
  12. You're not limited to running forms and reports from the navigation form. You can use navigation buttons to run macros as well, thus opening the range of functionality to any process you can write a macro or module for.

    Read Article
  13. Follow these five steps to add a title to an Access report header.

    Read Article
  14. Follow these seven steps to add a logo to an Access report header.

    Read Article