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Webucator's Free Working with Difficult People Tutorial

Lesson: The Impact of Unhealthy Personalities

Welcome to our free Working with Difficult People tutorial. This tutorial is based on Webucator's Working with Difficult People course.

Unhealthy personalities can have many negative effects throughout a workplace. In this lesson, we'll discuss the consequences of unhealthy personalities.

Lesson Goals

  • Learn about various types of work environments.
  • Learn the effects of low morale and high turnover.
  • Learn the legal implications relating to unhealthy behaviors.
  • Learn to recognize the hidden costs of unhealthy personalities in the workplace.
  • Learn about the benefits of a healthy environment.

Personality and Behavior

Personality is different from behavior, but it affects behavior.

Personality influences how we respond to information and experiences and is demonstrated in the way we express ourselves; it is a "style."

Behavior, on the other hand, is specifically what we do in different situations. While our behavior may be influenced by our personality style, behavior is controllable.

When we do not control our behavior, we experience negative consequences, and if we habitually allow our personality to dictate our behaviors, rather than influencing them, we may exhibit negative personality traits, which we will talk about in the next lesson.

Each personality has traits that give a person certain strengths and certain vocations. If those traits are unchecked, they may become weaknesses. For example:

  1. A person who is meticulous with details may be an excellent accountant, but that passion for details may cause him or her to be a micromanaging boss.
  2. If a person is willing to learn managerial skills and understands the value of delegation, a person may be both an excellent boss and an excellent accountant.

Workplace Environment

Performance and Morale

It is well known that attitude is contagious and impacts the environment around us, yet the environment we work in is directly related to our productivity. Not only that, but work environment has been shown to be almost as important to employees as pay.

An environment full of praise and encouragement will clearly motivate employees more than environment of oppression and criticism. The ideal workplace is a place where employees are:

  1. Greeted in a positive way at the start of each workday.
  2. Supported in a team environment.
  3. Encouraged to do their best.

Conversely, when employees work in an environment that is demotivating, they are not likely to do their best. They are likely to want to leave that environment physically, and will certainly leave it mentally.

An environment that is less than ideal is a place where employees:

  1. Feel they are exposed to anger from managers or co-workers.
  2. Feel a critical eye is always upon them.
  3. Feel threatened by managers or co-workers.
  4. Do not feel supported.
  5. Do not feel that they can do their best work.

Types of Environments

When these personality traits are allowed to get out of hand, they create negative environments. The environment affected by a negative personality can affect the morale and productivity of the other workers.

The Oppressive Environment

An oppressive environment results when a person uses his or her authority, whether granted or perceived, to restrict the freedom of other workers. Oppressive environments can include the following:

  1. A micromanaging supervisor who does not trust people to do things correctly.
  2. A supervisor who dictates the actions of his or her employees.
  3. Critical people who constantly barrage others with criticism of work or personal traits.
  4. Leadership that attempts to control the speech or even the thoughts of the employees.
  5. An employee who discounts the concerns of his or her staff or co-workers.

Negative Environment

Negative environments are evident immediately and are created by unhappy people who:

  1. Complain about the workload.
  2. Complain about customers.
  3. Complain about office surroundings and equipment, such as the copier machine.

Negative environment can also be marked by:

  1. A distinct lack of smiles or other positive expressions.
  2. Low employee interaction.
  3. Gossip.

People in a negative environment are often victims of their own choosing. As difficult as it may be to maintain a positive attitude, negative people make a choice to be negative and to allow other negative people to influence them.

The Untrusting Environment

The untrusting environment is an environment in which there is compromised trust between peers or between staff and supervisors.

Managers may not trust a staff member if that person is undependable or erratic, but many untrusting environments result from authoritarian supervisors who:

  1. Do not trust their own staff to do the work delegated to them.
  2. Repeatedly break promises.
  3. Do not defend or protect their staff.
  4. Show obvious preference for one staff member over others.

A lack of trust can take place in peer relationships as well. Co-workers who contribute to an untrusting environment may:

  1. Take credit for other people's work.
  2. Manipulate situations to their favor.
  3. Manipulate situations to the other person's detriment.
  4. Gossip.
  5. Speak detrimentally about co-workers.

The Overly Competitive Environment

Competition can motivate individuals in certain environments, but, in some highly competitive environments, the playing field isn't clearly communicated or kept fair.

When an environment becomes overly competitive, individuals may feel desperate to succeed, pushing them to undermine others or manipulates situations, causing productivity to decrease along with morale.

The Leaderless Environment

Unproductive environments result when the authority structure is confused. When management does not take a leadership role, the direction their team should take becomes vague.

In an unproductive environment:

  1. Supervisors hand over undue authority to their staff members.
  2. Staff members make their own rules.
  3. Little cohesiveness is found in processes between positions or departments.
  4. Vertical and horizontal communication is weak.
  5. There is no accountability for inappropriate behavior.

The Environment

Duration: 5 minutes.

In this exercise, you will respond to the following questions about personalities and the environment.


  1. An environment in which a manager dictates how a staff member will do a task is called a(n):
    1. Oppressive Environment
    2. Overly Competitive Environment
    3. Leaderless Environment

  2. Productivity is primarily affected by which of the following:
    1. Pay
    2. Number of employees
    3. The environment
    4. A supervisor's personality

  3. Personality is (choose all that apply):
    1. A reflection of one's attitude
    2. How we express ourselves
    3. How we behave
    4. A style

  4. Excessive competition:
    1. Increases productivity
    2. Increases morale
    3. Creates a fun environment
    4. Decreases morale

Solution:

Solutions:


  1. A. Oppressive environment

  2. C. The environment

  3. B. How we express ourselves and D. A style

  4. D. Decreases morale

Personal Application for Personality and the Workplace

Duration: 15 minutes.

In this exercise, you will contemplate the questions below regarding work environment.

  1. Imagine a workplace void of personality. Would you enjoy working in that environment? Why or why not?
  2. Describe your work environment. Do you have any problems in your work environment related to personalities and behavior? What are the losses to people or the company resulting from that situation?

Solution:

  1. When imagining a workplace without personality, you may describe a workplace that is mundane and where little changes from day to day. You may not want to work in such an environment because you enjoy the positive aspects of different types of personalities. While you may not want to work in an environment void of personality, you may welcome working in an environment void of bad behavior.
  2. You may have experienced some of the problems we've discussed in your workplace. These problems may be caused by negative personality traits or by behavior which can be affected by personality. As we've learned so far in this lesson, negative behavior can cause problems such as low morale and high turnover which can create a negative atmosphere and financial losses.

Morale and Turnover

The Role of the Supervisor

Many will say that employees do not leave their jobs; rather, they leave their bosses. This happens because:

  1. Some supervisors lack managerial skills.
  2. The supervisor's own supervisor does not delegate enough authority to manage well.

The lack of skills or authority is evidenced in two ways:

  1. The supervisor is difficult to work with.
  2. The supervisor does not manage other people who are difficult to work with.

The results of a Florida State University study were published in the fall, 2007 issue of Leadership Quarterly (Ray, B. December 4, 2006, Who's afraid of the big bad boss? http://www.fsu.edu/news/2006/12/04/bad.boss/ Accessed January 19, 2012). The results showed that 40% of employees felt they were working for a bad boss.

Other results indicated the following:

  1. 39% of workers said their supervisors failed to keep promises.
  2. 37% indicated their supervisor failed to give credit when due.
  3. 31% said their supervisor gave them the silent treatment during the past year.
  4. 27% report that their supervisor made negative comments about them to other employees or managers.
  5. 24% indicate their boss invaded their privacy.
  6. 23% said their supervisor blamed others to cover up personal mistakes or minimize embarrassment.

If 40% of employees felt they were working for bad bosses, and bosses are supposed to be the example for their employees, one can only wonder how many employees feel they work with bad co-workers.

Whether the problems stem from the behavior of a staff member, a peer, or a supervisor; the behavior can have a major impact on morale and morale is a major cause of attrition.

The Cost of Turnover

IT staffing services company JDA Professional Services studied the cost of turnover and reported the results on their Web site: http://www.jdapsi.com/Client/articles/coh (Del Monte, J., IT Employer Information - Cost of Hiring/Retention (COH). Accessed January 19, 2012 but as of at least 6/19/13 the link is no longer live; we leave it here to credit the information). Their study found that the costs of replacing a single employee can be very high because of both direct and indirect costs.

The direct costs of turnover can include:

  1. Creating and posting job ads and marketing for the position.
  2. Interviewing costs.
  3. Recruiting fees.
  4. Employment testing.
  5. Reference checks and screenings.
  6. Any salary increases over and above the previous employee.
  7. Sign-up bonuses.
  8. Relocation services.
  9. Training.

Even for a lower-level employee not receiving sign-on bonuses, relocation services, and salary increases; the cost of hiring and training is estimated to be over $10,000. Direct costs can range from 30% to 100% of a person's annual pay.

Moreover, turnover and morale are cyclical. Low morale results in turnover and turnover contributes to low morale. If the source of the low morale is never eradicated, the cycle continues.

Morale and Turnover

Duration: 5 minutes.

In this exercise, you will respond to the following questions about turnover.


  1. What can be inferred if a supervisor inconsistently manages a staff member who exhibits difficult behaviors?
    1. The supervisor is having a bad day.
    2. The supervisor has not been trained.
    3. The supervisor is a bad person.
    4. The supervisor is not very smart.

  2. What was the biggest complaint reported by employees about their supervisor in the Florida State University study?
    1. Their supervisors are plagiarizers.
    2. Their supervisor failed to give credit when due.
    3. Their supervisor failed to keep promises.
    4. Their supervisor made negative comments about them to other employees or managers.

  3. Which of the following are common costs of employee turnover?
    1. Training
    2. Purchasing new supplies
    3. Travel expenses
    4. Creating and posting job ads and marketing for the position

Solution:

Solutions:


  1. B. The supervisor has not been trained

  2. C. Their supervisor failed to keep promises

  3. A. Training and D. Creating and posting job ads and marketing for the position

Personal Application for Morale and Turnover

Duration: 10 minutes.

In this exercise, you will consider the following questions about turnover.


  1. How would you describe the current morale and turnover in your company or department? Do any of the listed supervisory issues apply?

  2. Does the morale contribute to turnover?
    1. If you have turnover:
      1. Can you quickly estimate the direct cost to the company for this turnover?
      2. Do you think it is too high? If so, what could be done to decrease it?
    2. If you do not have turnover:
      1. Estimate the cost of your own replacement.
      2. What is contributing to the stability in your department or company?

Solution:

    1. To answer this question, consider how people react to supervisors where you work. Is the supervisor easy to work with? Does the supervisor effectively address issues with other staff? Do you think the boss could be described as a "bad boss"?
    2. Consider the questions about turnover in relation to your workplace and whether or not you have high turnover. Refer to the information about calculating the real cost of turnover given previously. There is a lot to replacing an employee. Also consider the positive things that are contributing to a lack of turnover. What do you think is keeping turnover from happening?

Legal Implications

Some difficult personalities have the potential to cause legal problems. Oppressive personalities use various forms of harassment and intimidation to achieve their own goals. An oppressive person's goal may be:

  1. To build himself or herself up by tearing another person down.
  2. To force better productivity.
  3. To push a person to leave.

The behaviors may be mild or severe, or may be aimed at one person or everyone.

Any time we face a challenging personality, we should try to rectify the situation. However, in these cases if the situation cannot be rectified, it is important to know there are legal protections that may help. For employers, poor working conditions can lead to costly legal battles. Employers should do everything they can to prevent these situations from arising.

Grievance Processes

Most companies have a grievance process defined in their Policies and Procedures statement. If issues cannot be resolved directly, an employee may take their issue through that process. Employers who do not follow the grievance process as presented to the employees may be held legally liable, because the policies are considered a condition of employment.

Illegal Behavior

Certain behaviors may be directly illegal. Laws have been enacted, and continue to be enacted, to protect employees from behavior that may be harmful or unjust. Some of these laws are State laws, and some are Federal laws.

Bullying

Workplace bullying can include such tactics as:

  1. Verbal abuse
  2. Nonverbal abuse
  3. Psychological abuse
  4. Physical abuse
  5. Humiliation

Nearly half of all states have introduced bills that address workplace bullying. These Healthy Workplace bills:

  1. Forbid health-harming "abusive work environments."
  2. Hold employers liable unless they have taken steps to correct and prevent abuse when reported.

To date none of these bills have become law; however, many states have laws addressing hostile work environments.

Hostile Work Environments

A hostile work environment exists when:

  1. An employee experiences workplace harassment and fears going to work because of the offensive, intimidating, or oppressive atmosphere generated by the harasser.
  2. Management acts in a manner designed to make an employee quit in retaliation for some action. This allows employers to avoid unemployment benefit payments.

Many states have laws addressing the hostile workplace. There is no Federal law that addresses this situation, though hostility is addressed in part by anti-discrimination laws. Regardless of whether the behavior is illegal or not, the cost to the company is clear, and a wise company will work to keep this kind of behavior out of its ranks.

Harassment

Federal law protects some people from harassment when the harassment is discriminatory. Illegal discrimination covers:

  1. Race
  2. Color
  3. Religion
  4. National origin
  5. Disability
  6. Genetics
  7. Age
  8. Sex

Family Medical Leave Act

The Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) was put in place to protect people from retaliation or losing their job while suffering from unexpected health issues. People covered by the FMLA include:

  1. The employee.
  2. The employee's dependents.
  3. The employee's immediate family.

The FMLA provides the following to employees:

  1. 12 weeks of leave in any 12 month period.
  2. The same health insurance coverage as prior to the leave.

If a health care provider is willing to diagnose a "serious health condition" related to workplace stress, it does not matter if the stressed-out employee is able to work elsewhere or otherwise engage in normal day-to-day activities. This includes stress and anxiety about a pending termination or other performance issues. That person is still entitled to FMLA leave and a company cannot retaliate against him or her for taking that leave.

Illegal Behavior

Certain behaviors may be directly illegal. Laws have been enacted, and continue to be enacted, to protect employees from behavior that may be harmful or unjust. Some of these laws are State laws, and some are Federal laws.

Bullying

Workplace bullying can include such tactics as:

  1. Verbal abuse
  2. Nonverbal abuse
  3. Psychological abuse
  4. Physical abuse
  5. Humiliation

Nearly half of all states have introduced bills that address workplace bullying. These Healthy Workplace bills:

  1. Forbid health-harming "abusive work environments."
  2. Hold employers liable unless they have taken steps to correct and prevent abuse when reported.

To date none of these bills have become law; however, many states have laws addressing hostile work environments.

Hostile Work Environments

A hostile work environment exists when:

  1. An employee experiences workplace harassment and fears going to work because of the offensive, intimidating, or oppressive atmosphere generated by the harasser.
  2. Management acts in a manner designed to make an employee quit in retaliation for some action. This allows employers to avoid unemployment benefit payments.

Many states have laws addressing the hostile workplace. There is no Federal law that addresses this situation, though hostility is addressed in part by anti-discrimination laws. Regardless of whether the behavior is illegal or not, the cost to the company is clear, and a wise company will work to keep this kind of behavior out of its ranks.

Harassment

Federal law protects some people from harassment when the harassment is discriminatory. Illegal discrimination covers:

  1. Race
  2. Color
  3. Religion
  4. National origin
  5. Disability
  6. Genetics
  7. Age
  8. Sex

Family Medical Leave Act

The Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) was put in place to protect people from retaliation or losing their job while suffering from unexpected health issues. People covered by the FMLA include:

  1. The employee.
  2. The employee's dependents.
  3. The employee's immediate family.

The FMLA provides the following to employees:

  1. 12 weeks of leave in any 12 month period.
  2. The same health insurance coverage as prior to the leave.

If a health care provider is willing to diagnose a "serious health condition" related to workplace stress, it does not matter if the stressed-out employee is able to work elsewhere or otherwise engage in normal day-to-day activities. This includes stress and anxiety about a pending termination or other performance issues. That person is still entitled to FMLA leave and a company cannot retaliate against him or her for taking that leave.

Hostile Work Environments--Delete

A hostile work environment exists when:

  1. An employee experiences workplace harassment and fears going to work because of the offensive, intimidating, or oppressive atmosphere generated by the harasser.
  2. Management acts in a manner designed to make an employee quit in retaliation for some action. This allows employers to avoid unemployment benefit payments.

Many states have laws addressing the hostile workplace. There is no Federal law that addresses this situation, though hostility is addressed in part by anti-discrimination laws. Regardless of whether the behavior is illegal or not, the cost to the company is clear, and a wise company will work to keep this kind of behavior out of its ranks.

Legal Implications

Duration: 5 minutes.

In this exercise, you will respond to the following questions about the legal implications relating to difficult personalities.


  1. Match the following descriptions with their behaviors that are, or soon may be, illegal by federal or state law:
    1. Descriptions:
      1. Verbal, nonverbal, psychological, physical abuse and humiliation.
      2. When someone fears going to work because of the offensive, intimidating, or oppressive atmosphere generated by the harasser.
      3. Discrimination relating to race, color, religion, national origin, disability, genetics, age or sex.
    2. Behaviors
      1. Hostile work environment
      2. Bullying
      3. Harassment

  2. Which of the following is not a recourse an employee may have if an issue cannot be resolved directly?
    1. Grievance process per the company's policies and procedures.
    2. Quit the company.
    3. A federal lawsuit, as defined by the Family Medical Leave Act.
    4. Leave of absence with a doctor's determination.

Solution:

Solutions:


  1. i. Verbal, nonverbal, psychological, physical abuse and humiliation, and ii. Bullying
    ii. When someone fears going to work because of the offensive, intimidating, or oppressive atmosphere generated by the harasser, and i. Hostile work environment
    iii. Discrimination relating to race, color, religion, national origin, disability, genetics, age or sex, and iii. Harassment

  2. A federal lawsuit, as defined by the Family Medical Leave Act.

Harassment--Delete

Federal law protects some people from harassment when the harassment is discriminatory. Illegal discrimination covers:

  1. Race
  2. Color
  3. Religion
  4. National origin
  5. Disability
  6. Genetics
  7. Age
  8. Sex

Family Medical Leave Act--Delete

The Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) was put in place to protect people from retaliation or losing their job while suffering from unexpected health issues. People covered by the FMLA include:

  1. The employee.
  2. The employee's dependents.
  3. The employee's immediate family.

The FMLA provides the following to employees:

  1. 12 weeks of leave in any 12 month period.
  2. The same health insurance coverage as prior to the leave.

If a health care provider is willing to diagnose a "serious health condition" related to workplace stress, it does not matter if the stressed-out employee is able to work elsewhere or otherwise engage in normal day-to-day activities. This includes stress and anxiety about a pending termination or other performance issues. That person is still entitled to FMLA leave and a company cannot retaliate against him or her for taking that leave.

Personal Application for Legal Implications

Duration: 15 minutes.

In this exercise, you will consider the following scenario.


  1. It is very important to know what options are available to us should situations get too difficult. As supervisors, we need to be aware of what is available to our staff. Do you know what state laws and company policies affect you in your workplace? If not, at your next opportunity check with your Human Resources Department or governing agencies to find out.

Solution:

  1. Consider what you have learned about legal implications. Each state is different so check resources available from your state and/or your Human Resources Department.

Hidden Costs to a Company

The majority of costs to a company are not obvious. The hidden and indirect costs of allowing disruptive behaviors in the workplace are very high. They include the following:

Decreased Productivity

Anyone who has experienced challenging behaviors at work can tell you how it affects their ability to produce. As a rule of thumb, a 40-hour per week position averages 30 hours per week of direct service to the company after factoring in:

  1. Vacations
  2. Sick leave
  3. Meetings
  4. Holidays

If a person earning $50,000/year loses one hour of productivity per day, the annual cost to the company in lost wages and benefits is over $9,000.

Leaves

Oppressive work conditions can increase the instances of both sick leave and FMLA. A recent Finnish study showed that these conditions can increase sickness by over 26% (Kivimakia, M., Elovainiob, M., Vahterac, J. Workplace bullying and sickness absence in hospital staff. Occup. Environ. Med . 2000;57:656-660 doi:10.1136/oem.57.10.656 http://oem.bmj.com/content/57/10/656.full Accessed January 19, 2012). This is easy to understand because these conditions:

  1. Cause direct stress.
  2. Cause a decrease in a person's immune system making them more prone to disease.
  3. Justify "mental health days."

Over 20 years ago the National Institute of Occupational Safety Health (NIOSH) measured the cost of FMLA due to stress among the workforce at $19 billion per year (Sauter, S.L., Murphy, L.R., Hurrell, J. Prevention of work-related psychological disorders: A national strategy proposed by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). American Psychologist 1990;45(10)1146-1158).

Replacement Costs

As noted earlier in this lesson, the cost of replacing and training new hires at lower levels runs from 30% to 100% of the employee's annual salary, and can be up to 300% of the annual salary, depending on the position. Additional costs of attrition include:

  1. The loss of institutional knowledge (head knowledge) that went with the departing employee.
  2. The loss of productivity between the time the person left and the time another person is trained into the position.
  3. The decrease in the morale of other employees because of the loss of that person.
  4. Additional stress on management and staff who have to fill in for the empty position.
  5. Any overtime expenses required to make up for that missing person's work.
  6. Litigation costs should an employee bring a suit against the company.

The indirect costs for a $60,000 per year employee are estimated to average a little over $100,000.

Image and Revenue

Sour people produce sour customers. As consumers, we have all had experiences with sour people. Some of these experiences may include:

  1. Doing business with service personnel who were angry or rude.
  2. Encountering people who clearly did not want to be at work.
  3. Overhearing workers complain about work conditions or other workers.
  4. Watching non-verbal signs that the person feels burdened when asked for assistance.

This sour mood affects the customers and discourages them from purchasing products and returning to the store. The behavior of employees directly impacts sales and customer base.

Grievance Processes--Delete

Most companies have a grievance process defined in their Policies and Procedures statement. If issues cannot be resolved directly, an employee may take their issue through that process. Employers who do not follow the grievance process as presented to the employees may be held legally liable, because the policies are considered a condition of employment.

Hidden Costs to the Company

Duration: 10-15 minutes.

In this exercise, you will respond to the following questions about turnover.

  1. What four major factors affect the number of hours of direct service one can expect from an employee?

  2. What factor causes an increase in both sick leave and FMLA?

  3. Which of the following most affects the amount of merchandise purchased at a store?
    1. A door greeter.
    2. A clerk with a tattoo.
    3. A grumpy employee.
    4. Ambient lighting.

Solution:

Solutions:


  1. Four major factors that affect the number of hours of direct service one can expect from an employee are:
    1. A. Vacations
    2. A. Sick leave
    3. B. Meetings
    4. C. Holidays

  2. Stress can cause an increase in both sick leave and FMLA.

  3. C. A grumpy employee

The Benefits of a Healthy Environment

The benefits of a healthy environment should not be underrated. In an environment where personalities work cooperatively as a team, employees are motivated and want to be at work. Transforming a workplace environment from unhealthy to healthy can reduce costs by:

  1. Reducing tardiness and absenteeism.
  2. Decreasing turnover.
  3. Eliminating the need for mental health days.
  4. Dissolving workplace distractions.

Healthy environments also improve company profits. Companies with attractive environments can attract the best workers who have strong skill sets, thus creating a competitive edge in the marketplace. Additionally, the attitude and demeanor of a happy employee has a positive influence on customers.

The most powerful benefit a healthy company enjoys is employee loyalty. Loyalty is very difficult to measure, but very evident. Employees who are loyal to their company tend to:

  1. Be willing to work longer hours.
  2. Be dependable and self-driven.
  3. Achieve goals on time.
  4. Seek solutions to problems.
  5. Be enthusiastic around customers.
  6. Show ownership for company products and services.
  7. Willingly brag about their company in a variety of business and nonbusiness settings.
  8. Defend company policy and products.

The Benefits of a Healthy Environment

Duration: 5 minutes.

In this exercise, you will respond to the following questions about healthy environments.


  1. Which of the following is not benefits of a healthy environment?
    1. An increase in employee loyalty.
    2. A decrease in turnover.
    3. An increase in mental health days.
    4. A decrease in absenteeism.

  2. What kind of indirect advertising can a company expect to receive from loyal employees?
    1. Increased sales.
    2. Word of mouth advertising.
    3. Public promotions.
    4. Networking.

Solution:

    Solutions:


  1. C. An increased in mental health days.

  2. B. Word of mouth advertising.

Personal Application for Benefits of a Healthy Environment

Duration: 20 minutes.

In this exercise, you will consider the following questions.


  1. Imagine your own work environment without the negative effects of difficult people. If you are not experiencing a difficult personality, think about another department that is challenged in this way.
  2. Write a paragraph that describes the work environment. Include how the stress level will be, how people will interact with each other, what kind of productivity will be seen, and who will take on which roles
  3. List three to five benefits that you as an employee will receive in this healthy environment.
  4. List three to five benefits that your employer will receive in this healthy environment.

Solution:

  1. Think about any issues you've experienced or noticed in your workplace. What are the main issues contributing to the problem, in your opinion?
  2. Your paragraph should give detail about how you see a healthy work environment functioning. Will there be no stress at all? A little? A lot?
  3. Using what you've learned, make sure you list includes how employees will benefit.
  4. Using what you've learned, make sure you list includes how employer will benefit.