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Webucator's Free Ajax Tutorial

Welcome to our free Ajax tutorial. This tutorial is based on Webucator's Ajax Training course.
Start Tutorial or choose from a lesson below
Web development involves a combination of client-side programming and server-side programming.
The term AJAX is a pseudo-acronym for "Asynchronous JavaScript And XML," but is now used much more broadly to cover all methods of communicating with a server using JavaScript. As we will see, Ajax is not always asynchronous and does not always involve XML. Node.js is an open-source, cross-platform server that runs JavaScript on the server-side; we'll use Node.js as the back end for our Ajax demos and exercises.
As a way of review, the term AJAX is a pseudo-acronym for "Asynchronous JavaScript And XML," but is now used much more broadly to cover all methods of communicating with a server using JavaScript. Again, Ajax is not always asynchronous and does not always involve XML.
jQuery offers a powerful yet easy-to-use set of tools to manipulate HTML pages, extending what one can do with core JavaScript. In particular, jQuery's Ajax methods allow us to write and maintain fewer lines of code, but to easily create complex functionality.
In this lesson, you will apply the concepts you have learned so far.
In this lesson, you will learn how to build more complex functionality using Ajax.
Browsers on our desktops and mobile devices implement the same-origin policy, preventing remote scripts to run if they come from external sites. We look here at two strategies for accessing remote data via Ajax: Cross-Origin Resource Sharing (CORS) and JSON with Padding (JSON-P).