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Webucator's Free Intermediate Microsoft Word Tutorial

Lesson: Working with Illustrations

Welcome to our free Intermediate Microsoft Word tutorial. This tutorial is based on Webucator's Intermediate Microsoft Word 2019 Training course.

Adding illustrations to Microsoft Word documents is a great way to improve their look and feel and also to illustrate your points. Fortunately, it's easy to add pictures (your own or choose from a large library of pictures provided by Microsoft) and to add charts and shapes.

Lesson Goals

  • Learn to insert charts into Microsoft Word documents.
  • Learn to edit charts in Microsoft Word documents.
  • Learn to use clip art to illustrate your documents.
  • Learn to insert shapes into Microsoft Word documents.
  • Learn to use SmartArt to illustrate your documents.
  • Learn to use captions.
  • Learn to use Word Building Blocks.

Adding and Editing Charts

To insert a chart into a Microsoft Word document:

  1. Place your cursor in the location in your document in which you would like to insert the chart.
  2. From the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click Chart: Chart Command
  3. In the Insert Chart dialog box, select the type of chart you want by clicking on it in the left column: Insert Chart Dialog Box
  4. Select a specific chart on the right and click OK: Select Chart
  5. Note that the chart now appears in your document and a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet opens up:Chart Appears
  6. To edit the chart:
    1. Type over the axis labels and data with your own axis labels and data.
    2. Resize the chart by dragging the box representing the range.
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Working with Charts

Selecting a chart in Word brings up the Chart Tools tabs:

  1. Design: Chart Tools Design Tab
  2. Format: Chart Tools Format Tab

In Word 2010, there is a Layout Chart Tools tab available, as well. Also, the tabs look different in each version of Word.

Working with Charts

Duration: 15 to 25 minutes.

In this exercise, you will add a chart to a document and then edit the design and layout of the chart.

  1. Open or go to Plants in my yard - Intermediate.docx.
  2. Insert a chart at the end of the document that looks like the one shown below (the data labels are listed below the image for easier reading):Chart Exercise
    1. Attracts Butterflies
    2. Deer Resistant
    3. Drought Tolerant
    4. Attracts Hummingbirds
    5. Cooler than Other Flowers
    6. Beautiful Foliage
  3. Save your document.

Solution:

  1. Place your cursor on a new line at the end of the document.
  2. From the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click Chart: Chart Command
  3. Select the 3-D Stacked Column chart (in Word 2010, Stacked Column in 3-D) and click OK: 3D Stacked Column Chart
  4. Edit the data in Microsoft Excel as follows:
    1. Delete columns C and D by selecting the columns, and then right-clicking. Right-Click
    2. Click Delete and then select Table Columns (in Word 2010, just click Delete).Delete
    3. Add two rows to the data range by dragging the lower right corner of the range down: Drag for Range
    4. Type in the six attributes and the corresponding counts in cells A2:B7. Then type "Count of Attributes" in cell B1: Type in Cell
    5. Select the chart by clicking on it. Click the plus sign to the right of the chart. In the Chart Elements box, scroll to and uncheck the Legend check box. Legend Check Box
    6. Select the chart columns by clicking on one of them. On the Chart Tools Format tab, click Shape Fill and then select Red: Select Red
    7. Save the file.

In Word 2010, to turn the data labels on, on the CHART TOOLS LAYOUT tab, click Data Labels and then click Show. To turn the legend off, on the Chart Tools > Layout tab, click Legend and then click None.

Working with Clip Art

A large library of Clip Art, including drawings, videos, sounds and photographs, is available from Office.com. To insert Clip Art into your document:

  1. From the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click Online Pictures (in Word 2010, this option is called Clip Art): Online Pictures Option
  2. In the Insert Pictures dialog box that appears:
    1. Type in your search word(s) and press Return.
    2. View the results of your search: Search Results

In Word 2010, you will use the Clip Art dialog box that appears at the right to search for and select clip art files.

Working with Clip Art

Duration: 5 to 15 minutes.

In this exercise, you will search for Clip Art available from Office.com and insert an image into a document.

  1. Open or go to Plants in my yard - Intermediate.docx.
  2. Insert and customize a cover page in the document by:
    1. From the Insert tab, in the Pages group, click Cover Page and then select "Banded" (if you are using Word 2010, select an available option): Banded Cover Page
    2. Delete the circled text in the image below by selecting it and pressing Delete on your keyboard (you might have to press Delete twice): Delete Text
  3. Insert a picture of a flower from Clip Art on your cover page.
  4. Save your document.

Solution:

  1. From the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click Online Pictures (if you are using Word 2010, select Clip Art): Online Pictures Command
  2. In the Insert Picture dialog box, search for "flower": Search for Flower
  3. Select the picture of your choice by double-clicking it.
  4. If necessary, resize the picture so that it fits on the cover page.
  5. Save your document.

Using Shapes

You can easily add a wide variety of shapes to your Microsoft Word documents, including squares, circles, stars, arrows, smiley faces, lines, equation shapes, callouts, and more. To insert a shape into a Microsoft Word document:

  1. From the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click Shapes: Shapes Command
  2. Select a shape by clicking on it: Selecrt Shape
  3. Your cursor will change to a plus sign: Cursor is Plus Sign
  4. Click down in your document where you would like to place the shape, drag your mouse until the shape is the size you want it to be and then release your mouse.

Selecting a shape in Word brings up the Drawing Tools Format tab (this tab will look different in Word 2010): Drawing Tools Format Tab

Positioning Shapes

To position shapes:

  1. After inserting the shape, click it to select it.
  2. With the cursor as a four-pointed arrow, click and drag to position the shape. Position Shape

Shape Formatting

Beginning in Word 2016, when you insert a shape into a document, you can now choose from preset fills and colors. When you insert the shape, the Drawing Tools Format tab opens, containing the presets.

Shape Formatting

Wrapping Text Around Shapes

To wrap text around shapes:

  1. With the shape selected, select the Layout Options icon. Layout Options Icon
  2. Select a text-wrapping option. Select Text-Wrapping Option

Working with Icons

New in Word 2019 is the ability to insert Scalable Vector Graphics (SVGs), or icons. To do so, from the Insert tab in the Illustrations group, select Icons.Icons

The Insert Icon dialog box opens. To insert an icon, click it and then click Insert. Insert Icon

The icon is now inserted into your document. You can click and drag to move it or rotate it. Inserted Icon

Using 3D Models

Another new feature of Word 2019 is the ability to insert a 3-D model. To do so:

  1. From the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, select 3D Model drop-down list, and then choose to select a model from a file or from an online source. 3D Model
  2. Search for and select a 3-D model to use to insert it into your document. Insert 3D Model

The 3-D model is now inserted into your worksheet. You can click and drag to move it or rotate it. Inserted 3D Model

Adding Shapes

Duration: 5 to 10 minutes.

In this exercise, you will add a shape to a document.

  1. Open or go to Plants in my yard - Intermediate.docx.
  2. Insert a Smiley Face Shape in the footer of the document such that your footer looks like the screenshot below:Adding Shapes Exercise
  3. Save your document.

Solution:

  1. Double-click in the Footer to make the Footer the active part of your document.
  2. From the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click Shapes: Shapes Command
  3. Select the Smiley Face shape under Basic Shapes: Select Smiley Face
  4. Place the smiley face in the footer of the document and drag it until you are happy with the size.
  5. From the Drawing Tools Format tab, in the Shape Styles group, click Shape Fill and select Red: Red Fill
  6. Save the document.

Working with SmartArt

SmartArt diagrams include process diagrams, list diagrams, hierarchy diagrams, pyramid diagrams and much more.

Inserting SmartArt

To insert SmartArt:

  1. Place your cursor in the location in your document where you want your SmartArt graphic to appear.
  2. From the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click SmartArt: SmartArt Option
  3. In the Choose a SmartArt Graphic dialog box, select a SmartArt graphic to preview it on the right: Choose Graphic
  4. Click OK to add the SmartArt Graphic to your document.

Selecting a SmartArt diagram in Word brings up the SmartArt Tools tabs:

  1. Design: SmartArt Design Tools Tab
  2. Format: SmartArt Format Tools Tab

Modifying SmartArt

Right-click the SmartArt and then use the available options, including the SmartArt Quick Styles at the top, to modify the SmartArt.

Modify SmartArt

Positioning SmartArt

To position SmartArt, once inserted, you can move the SmartArt by clicking and dragging it. Hover your cursor over the SmartArt and when it turns to a four-headed arrow, you can click and drag.

Position SmartArt

Working with SmartArt

Duration: 10 to 20 minutes.

In this exercise, you will add a SmartArt graphic showing the relationships between the plants in the document in which we have been working.

  1. Open or go to Plants in my yard - Intermediate.docx.
  2. Insert a SmartArt graphic at the end of your document that looks like the image below (the plant names are listed below the image for easier reading):SmartArt Exercise
    • Plants
      • Trees
        • Japanese Maple
        • Lilac
        • Red Bud
    • Perennials
      • Columbine
      • Butterfly Weed
      • Purple Coneflower
      • Bleeding Heart
      • Jack-in-the-pulpit
      • Siberian Iris
    • Ground Covers
      • Lamb's Ear
      • Sedum
      • Anemone
  3. Save your document.

Solution:

  1. Place your cursor at the end of your document, a line below the "Count of Attributes" image.
  2. From the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click SmartArt: SmartArt Command
  3. In the dialog box that opens, click Hierarchy and then the image titled Hierarchy, and then OK: Hierarchy
  4. From the SmartArt Tools Design tab, in the Create Graphic group, click Text Pane: Text Pane Option
  5. Enter text and add additional boxes in the second and third rows by typing and pressing Enter and Tab: Enter Text
  6. From the SmartArt Tools Format tab, in the Shape Styles group, click Shape Fill and then select a color: Shape Fill
  7. Save the document.

Creating Captions

You may want to add captions to your Word elements. You can add captions to tables, figures, and images, and then customize those captions.

To add a caption to an image:

  1. Right-click the image and select Insert Caption. Insert Caption Option
  2. In the Caption dialog box, type the caption in the Caption: text box.
  3. Select a Label. To exclude a label, select the Exclude label from caption check box.
  4. Select where to position the caption from the Position drop-down list. Click OK to insert the caption. Insert the Caption

Modify Caption Properties

You can change caption formats when adding them in Word using the options in the Caption dialog box.

  1. To exclude the label in the caption, select the Exclude label from caption check box.
  2. To change position of the caption, select options in the Position drop-down list.

Modify Caption

Using Cross-References

You can use cross-references to refer to figures in your documents, so that if the figure numbers change, this information will automatically update.

To create a cross-reference:

  1. Put your cursor where you want the cross-reference to appear.
  2. From the References tab, in the Captions group, select Cross-reference. Cross-reference Command
  3. In the Cross-reference dialog box, select the reference type and other options. Cross-reference Option
  4. In the For which... section, select the item you want to reference and select Insert. Insert Cross-reference

Using Building Blocks

Word provides a feature called Building Blocks, reusable text or graphics or other elements that can help you be more efficient. Word provides a Building Blocks library and you can also create your own.

To use a Building Block:

  1. From the Insert tab of the Ribbon, in the Text group, select Quick Parts and from the drop-down, select Building Blocks Organizer. Building Blocks Organizer Option
  2. Select the Building Block on the left to see a preview of it on the right. Select Building Blocks
  3. To insert it in your document, select Insert. Insert Building Blocks

To create and save a Building Block:

  1. Select the text or image element that you want to use to create a Building Block.
  2. From the Insert tab of the Ribbon, in the Text group, select Quick Parts and from the drop-down, select Save Selection to Quick Part Gallery. Save Selection to Quick Part Gallery
  3. In the Create New Building Block dialog box, select a name for the Building Block, as well as any other options, and click OK to save it. Save Quick Part
  4. It is now available for reuse.

Inserting Text Boxes

To insert a Building Block text box:

  1. From the Insert tab of the Ribbon, in the Text group, select Quick Parts and from the drop-down, select Building Blocks Organizer. Building Blocks Organizer
  2. Scroll down until you see the text box options in the Gallery column. Gallery Column
  3. To insert a text box option, select it, preview it on the right, and click Insert. Insert Text Box

Moving Building Blocks between Documents

Once you have saved a Building Block, it is saved as a template. To use it in another document, access it via the Quick Parts drop-down list.

Editing Building Block Properties

To edit Building Block properties:

  1. From the Insert tab, in the Text group, select Quick Parts and from the drop-down, select Building Blocks Organizer. Building Blocks Organizer
  2. Select the Building Block to edit, and select Edit Properties. Edit Properties
  3. Modify the Building Block and click OK to save the changes. Modify Building Block

Inserting a Building Block in a Document

Duration: 5 to 10 minutes.

In this exercise, you will insert a Building Block in a Word document.

  1. Open a new, blank Word document.
  2. Insert in the document a Building Block cover page of your choice.

Solution:

  1. With a new, blank document open, from the Insert tab of the Ribbon, in the Text group, select Quick Parts and from the drop-down, select Building Blocks Organizer. Building Blocks Organizer
  2. Scroll through and select a cover page Building Block (you will see the Cover Page listings under Gallery). Select Cover Page
  3. To preview the cover page, click it and view it on the right. To insert it, select Insert. Insert Cover Page