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Webucator's Free Intermediate Microsoft Word 2013 Tutorial

Lesson: Viewing Your Documents

Welcome to our free Intermediate Microsoft Word 2013 tutorial. This tutorial is based on Webucator's Intermediate Microsoft Word 2013 Training course.

In this lesson, you will learn about different ways you can view and edit your document.

Lesson Goals

  • Learn about Document Views.
  • Show and hide the Navigation pane.
  • Use the Navigation pane to quickly get to different sections of your document.
  • Use the Navigation pane to reorganize your document.
  • Use the Navigation pane to search within your document.
  • Use multiple windows to view different parts of one document at the same time.
  • Use multiple windows to view multiple documents at the same time.

Document Views

By default, when you work in a Microsoft Word document, what you see on your screen is what you will see on paper after printing. Depending on the work you are doing and / or what the document is intended for, it is sometimes helpful to view the document in a different way. There are five Document Views, or ways to view your document while working on it:

  1. Read Mode. Use the Read Mode view to view your document in two columns. (In Word 2007 and 2010, Read Mode is not available; instead, Full Screen Reading is an option.)
  2. Print Layout. Use the Print Layout view to see what the document will look like when printed.
  3. Web Layout. Use the Web Layout view to see what the document will look like as a Web page.
  4. Outline. Use the Outline view to see how your document is laid out and to make structural changes to your document.
  5. Draft. Use the Draft view to focus on and make quick changes to your text. Note that images and headers and footers can not be seen or edited in the Draft view.

There are two ways to change your document vew in Microsoft Word:

  1. From the VIEW tab in the Views group, select a view: View Group
  2. Click on one of the document view icons in the Status Bar: Status Bar

Using the Navigation Pane

The Navigation pane is used to help you navigate quickly through a Word document. By default, the Navigation pane is hidden. (Please note that the Navigation pane is not available in Word 2007.) There are two ways to open the Navigation pane:

  1. From the VIEW tab in the Show group, check Navigation Pane: Navigation Pane in Show Group of View Tab
  2. Press CTRL+F on the keyboard. This is the method to use if you are going to use the Navigation pane to search for text in your document.

The Navigation pane has three tabs, each of which is used for different purposes:Navigation Tabs

  1. HEADINGS. Use this tab to see all the headings in your document and to quickly move to different section of your document. The highlighted heading shows the location of your cursor in your document. To move to another section of your document, simply click on another heading. To re-organize your document, simply drag and drop a heading from one location to another: Navigation Pane Headings Tab

    Note that if you type a word or phrase in the search box while the HEADINGS tab is selected, all the headings to sections that contain your search will become highlighted.

  2. PAGES. Use this tab to see all the pages in your document and to quickly move from one page to another. The highlighted page shows the location of your cursor in your document. To move to another page, simply click on it: Navigation Pane Pages Tab
  3. RESULTS. Use this tab to see all the results for a specific search and to quickly move from one result to another. The highlighted search result shows in the main document window. To move to a different search result, simply select it in the Navigation pane: Navigation Pane Results Tab

Use Show/Hide

The Show/Hide feature of Word is useful when editing documents, as some formatting marks are difficult to spot with formatting marks hidden.

To enable Show/Hide:

  1. From the HOME tab, in the Paragraph group, select the Show/Hide command. Show/Hide Command in Paragraph Group of Home Tab
  2. Formatting marks are now visible within the document. Document with Formatting Marks
  3. To hide them, select the Show/Hide command again.

Using the Navigation Pane

Duration: 5 to 15 minutes.

In this exercise, you will use the Navigation pane to locate sections, pages and text within a document. (If you are using Word 2007, you can perform this activity using the Search dialog box, accessed by pressing CTRL+F on the keyboard.)

  1. Use the Navigation pane to quickly jump to the following sections of the document:
    1. Columbine
    2. Lamb's Ear
    3. Perennials
    4. Japanese Maple
  2. Use the Navigation pane to quickly jump to the following pages of the document:
    1. Page 4.
    2. Page 6.
    3. Page 1.
  3. Use the Navigation pane to answer the following questions:
    1. How many times does the word "butterflies" appear in the document?
    2. What plant description contains the words "larval host"?
    3. On what pages does the word "columbine" appear?
    4. Do the words"drought tolerant" appear under the Heading "Columbine"?

Solution:

  1. Open or go to Plants in my yard - Intermediate.docx. To view the Navigation pane, from the VIEW tab in the Show group, check Navigation pane: Navigation Pane in Show Group of View Tab
    1. On the HEADINGS tab:
      1. Click on "Columbine" and note that your cursor is now in front of the heading "COLUMBINE" in the document: Navigation Pane
      2. Click on "Lamb's Ear" and note that your cursor is now in front of the heading "LAMB'S EAR" in the document.
      3. Click on "Perennials" and note that your cursor is now in front of the heading "PERENNIALS" in the document.
      4. Click on "Japanese Maple" and note that your cursor is now in front of the heading "JAPANESE MAPLE" in the document.
    2. On the PAGES tab:
      1. Click on "Page 4" and note that your cursor is now at the top of page 4 in the document: Navigation Pane
      2. Click on "Page 6" and note that your cursor is now at the top of page 6 in the document.
      3. Click on "Page 1" and note that your cursor is now at the top of page 1 in the document.
    3. Answers and solutions to the questions in the third exercise follow:
      1. Answer: 7.
        1. Click on the RESULTS tab, type "butterflies" into the search box and then count the results: Results Tab Search Box
      2. Answer: Butterfly weed.
        1. Click on the RESULTS tab, type "larval host" into the search box to find it in the document: Results Tab Search Box
      3. Answer: Page 3.
        1. Click on the PAGES tab, type "columbine" into the search box and see what pages show up in the results: Pages Tab Search Box
      4. Answer: No.
        1. Click on the HEADINGS tab, type "drought transplant" into the search box. Headings that include the words "drought transplant" are highlighted: Headings Tab Search Box

Multiple Windows

It is sometimes beneficial to view two different parts of the same document at the same time. The two easiest ways to do this are:

  1. To split the window the document is in.
  2. To add a new window and then arrange the windows such that you can view them sidy by side.

You can also arrange windows to view multiple different documents at the same time.

Splitting a Window to View Different Parts of One Document in One Window

Splitting a window enables you to view different parts of one document at one time. To split a window:

  1. From the VIEW tab in the Window group, click Split: Split in Window Group of View Tab
  2. The split line will appear in the center of your document. Click your mouse to accept that position or move your mouse up or down before clicking to change the location.
  3. Place your cursor above and below the split line and experiment with scrolling each section independently.
  4. Click Remove Split to get rid of the split line: Remove Split

Open a Second Window to View one Document in Two Windows

It is possible to have the same document open in two different windows at the same time. You can then view them side by side, which makes it easy to see different parts of the document at the same time. Depending on what you are trying to accomplish, this is often more efficient than splitting the document. To view your document in two windows simultaneously:

  1. From the VIEW tab in the Window group, click New Window: New Window in Window Group of View Tab
  2. To view the two windows side by side, click View Side by Side: View Side by Side
  3. Changes you make in either window will also appear in the other window. To get back to one window, simply close one of the windows.

Arranging Windows such that All Open Windows get Equal Screen Space

If you have multiple documents or windows of one document open and want to view all at the same time, you can easily do so:

  1. From the VIEW tab in the Window group, click Arrange All: Arrange All in Window Group of View Tab
  2. To maximize one of the windows, simply click the Maximize box in the upper right corner of the window: Maximize Box
  3. To change the way the windows are laid out on your screen, simply drag the windows to the size you want.

Working with Multiple Windows

Duration: 10 to 20 minutes.

In this exercise, you will split, add and arrange windows in order to view multiple documents and sections of one document at the same time.

  1. Open or go to Plants in my yard - Intermediate.docx.
  2. Use the information learned in this lesson to:
    1. Change your document view to look like the below:Multiple Windows
    2. Change your document view to look like the below:Multiple Windows
    3. Open a new document and view it side by side with Plants in my yard - Intermediate.docx

Solution:

  1. To split the window into two parts as shown in the first image in this exercise:
    1. Scroll to the top of the document.
    2. From the VIEW tab in the Window group, click Split: Split in Window Group of View Tab
    3. Click in the center of the window: Click in Center of Window
    4. Place your cursor above the Split line and scroll until the section matches the corresponding section of the image in the exercise.
    5. Place your cursor below the Split line and scroll until the section matches the corresponding section of the image in the exercise.
  2. To open a new window and view it side by side with the first window as shown in the second image in this exercise:
    1. Scroll to the top of the document.
    2. From the VIEW tab in the Window group, click New Window: New Window in Window Group of View Tab
    3. From the VIEW tab in the Window group, click View Side by Side (you can do this in either window):View Side by Side in Window Group of View Tab
    4. As Synchronous Scrolling is automatically selected when you click View Side by Side, you have to deselect it. From the VIEW tab in the Window group, click Synchronous Scrolling (you can do this in either window):Synchronous Scrolling in Window Group of View Tab
    5. Scroll in each window until the windows match the corresponding windows in the image in the exercise.
  3. To open a new document and view it side by side with Plants in my yard - Intermediate.docx:
    1. First, make sure Plants in my yard - Intermediate.docx is only open in one window.
    2. Open a new blank document.
    3. From the View tab in the Window group, click View Side by Side (you can do this in either document): View Side by Side in Window Group of View Tab