Webucator Blog

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Python 3 surpasses Python 2 on Stack Overflow – April, 2016

Python 3 came out in 2008. That’s eight whole years ago. This past month, April 2016, is the first month that there have been more Python 3-related questions on Stack Overflow than Python 2-related questions. It has taken a long time, but Python 3 finally seems to be getting as much usage as Python 2. It’ll be interesting to see if this is a tipping point and usage of Python 2 begins to plummet. Here’s the latest chart:
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HTML Attribute Values and Quotes (and Dreamweaver)

According to the W3C, HTML5 attribute values can be wrapped in single quotes or double quotes or no quotes at all. The same rules apply to HTML4, though some form of quotes is recommended. And in XHTML, values have to be wrapped in quotes, either single or double.

Dreamweaver CC 2015, out of the box, only wants double quotes around attribute values, which is weird. Misha Abesadze asked about this on the Adobe forum and Madhusudan N answered by describing how to fix Dreamweaver so that it doesn’t mark single-quoted attribute values with error messages. In the video below, we show the solution: Continue Reading »

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Webucator Awards Computer Science Scholarship to University of Washington Student

Webucator offers a Computer Science scholarship annually to support a student who shows potential for leadership in the field of Computer Science. There was a lot of interest in the scholarship again this year and we are happy to award it to Hokyin (Joe) Ma, a student at the University of Washington. Hokyin has been interested in computer science since he was 12 years old and hopes to turn his passion into a career. Continue Reading »

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Still using Python 2? It is time to upgrade.

Most Python programmers agree that Python 3, which has been available since 2008, is a big improvement over Python 2, but many (most?) Python developers are still using Python 2. The main reasons for this, according to a 2014 survey, are:

  1. They are relying on Python 2 libraries that have not been ported to Python 3.
  2. They have a large Python 2 code base, which would be time consuming and difficult to rewrite.
  3. They see no real advantage to switching.

But there are now clear signs that Python 2, which one developer argues we should start calling “Legacy Python”, is on it’s way out. Continue Reading »