Webucator's Blog

|

Does your Website Meet Accessibility Standards?

In the United States, twenty percent of adults have a disability, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Disabilities that may impede a person’s ability to use a website include:

  • Deafness and loss of auditory capacity
  • Limited visual acuity and blindness
  • Cognitive medical conditions
  • Learning disabilities
  • Speech disabilities
  • Movement-based limitations
  • Photosensitivity
  • Other types of disabilities which impede content consumption.

The World Wide Web consortium (W3C) defines accessibility as the practice of insuring that people with disabilities can perceive, understand, navigate, and interact with websites and tools, and that they can contribute equally without barriers.

In spite of the emphasis given to accessibility issues in every web standard, actual implementation of accessibility best practices is still sub-par in many websites and web applications. In this blog post, I’ll discuss some of these best practices, explore the current state of accessibility tools, and give you a few pointers on things that you can do today to improve the accessibility of your website or applications.

Need more help? Click to learn Web Accessibility best practices from a live instructor. 

Continue Reading »

|

CSS Maintenance Best Practices

If you’ve ever worked on a large website as part of a team, or even if you’ve ever worked on a small website with a long history, you know that one of the first things that can get out of control and cause maintenance nightmares is the site’s CSS. After a while of people making one-time changes and additions, it often seems like every additional change breaks something else.

For this reason, various people have come up with strategies and best practices for keeping CSS under control. In this article, I’ll discuss a few of these best practices and then show how using a CSS framework such as Bootstrap 4 can make doing the right thing almost effortless.

Continue Reading »

|

NYTimes.com, Please Stop Blocking Copy & Paste

Please share to see if we can get the NYTimes.com to change this.

Dear New York Times website,

Awhile back, you released a new website design that prevents readers like me from copying content from your articles. When I double-click on a word to highlight it, the page zooms. That’s not what I want or expect. If I need to zoom in on a web page, I can zoom. All modern browsers have built-in methods for changing the display size of page content.  Continue Reading »

|

Social Media from a Web Developer’s Perspective

Americans spend more time on Facebook than any other website, according to a recent Nielson study. In general, Americans spend a quarter of their Internet time on social sites. For web developers, jumping into the social trend is a must.

To help students in our web design training and web development training classes, we reached out to an expert on social site development. We asked Paul deGrandis, a developer who has worked at social sites such as Etsy and Tutorspree, for his perspective on the social trend.  Continue Reading »

|

Business Tips for Web Designers

In addition to writing code and planning Web sites, freelance designers and developers need an arsenal of business skills. To help students in our our web design training classes, we asked an expert to provide his advice. The following guest post from Neil Tortorella provides advice on the business side of web design and development.

Continue Reading »

|

Develop your Web Design Career

Neil Tortorella calls himself a “designosaur.” Why? He’s been a designer since the 80s.

Originally a graphic designer, he switched to web design in the early years of AOL’s release.   “Back then we all did strange stuff, mostly because we were pretty much clueless,” Tortorella says. “Flaming, spinning logos. Metaphor designs and all such weirdness.”

Web design has come a long way since the blinking images and scrolling text of the 90s, and so has Tortorella. He now has a successful career as a web designer and has recently published a book, Starting Your Career as a Freelance Web Designer.  We asked Tortorella the three essential questions commonly asked by newbie web designers from our web design training classes.  Here are his thoughts. Continue Reading »

|

Two Introduction to Web Design Webinars

If you’ve ever wondered how to learn web design, these webinars are the answer! These two webinars introduce attendees to the basics of web design and key web design concepts. Those interested in learning Dreamweaver should attend “Get Started with Adobe Dreamweaver” on October 27. Anyone looking to learn HTML is invited to “Introduction to HTML” on December 14. Each webinar will provide helpful tips and suggest key resources. Below are the details for both webinars.

Continue Reading »

|

Dreamweaver CS5 with PHP and MySQL

Have you ever wanted to use Dreamweaver CS5 to run PHP pages? What about displaying data in a PHP page from a MySQL database? Well, it is a lot easier than you might think! I have written a series of 5 blogs to take you step-by-step through the connection and testing process. To achieve total success, go through the blogs in the order listed below.

Continue Reading »